Funding needed! Clear the Shelter!

Funding needed! Clear the Shelter!

ADLA urgently needs your help to maximize their adoptions in the rescue initiative Clear the Shelters!

Clear the Shelters is promoted and aired by television network NBC, and in Puerto Rico by the network Telemundo as “Desocupar los Albergues.” ADLA has participated in this initiative since it began in 2014, adopting out many of its rescues at the reduced fee of $50. This year, we need your support to make it happen!

Funding needed Clear the Shelters

On August 18th, ADLA’s adoption center will be set up in the public plaza of the municipality of Loiza. Loiza is also where the ADLA Shelter is located and is also one of poorest municipalities of Puerto Rico, with a majority of its population living under the poverty level. Every day, we cater to this disadvantaged community by operating our Shelter: rescuing stray dogs that are roaming the streets and beaches.

Since 2005, ADLA has rescued and rehomed over 3,300 dogs. Hurricane María has led to an increase in the number of abandoned dogs, which in turn has increased our intake and expenses.

We have rescued over 118 dogs during this year alone, and we have 80 dogs currently at the Shelter. We need to get as many dogs adopted on August 18th as possible!

funding needed clear the shelter

  1. In anticipation of the Clear the Shelters initiative, all our adoption fees have been lowered to $50. Yet we are still rescuing and rehabilitating at the same rate and cost as before.

Rescuing one dog includes:                                                                                                                A veterinary visit prior to the adoption to ensure the dog is healthy: $15                            Vaccinations (including rabies and cost of deparasiting): $85                                                              4DX which checks for heartworm, ehrlichia, anaplasmosis, and lyme disease: $65                        Heartworm treatment (if necessary): $350                                                                                          Sterilization: $100

That is a total of $615 per pet. 

  1. We want to make an impact in our community by not only rescuing the animals, but promoting responsible pet care: On August 18th, we will promote responsible pet care within the community of Loiza. After the event we must do house-checks for each potential adopter to make sure the dog will be in a safe environment.

Donate now to Help ADLA adopt out as many dogs as possible during  Clear the Shelter day! 

Funding needed Clear t

Ela: The Little Dog Who Thought She Was BIG!

Ela: The Little Dog Who Thought She Was BIG!

By Ela Stolarczyk, ADLA Board Member

One Saturday in July 2015, after the shelter clean up, I was driving home with Lucy, another volunteer,  and we got a little lost in the area of Isla Verde. This is when I spotted a small black animal with a white tail down. I remember I was asking Lucy: “Do you think it is a dog or a cat?” We turned to the right and stopped the car to have a better look. We saw a small dirty dog, in an advanced stage of pregnancy and with a hairless tail who was walking along the road just long enough until the cars had passed, so she could then cross the street and check out if there was any food in the trash next to the Llorens Torres ‘caserio’ (the largest housing project in Puerto Rico with some sketchy areas). I remember thinking that she is quite smart crossing the street so carefully. I guess you have to be smart to survive on the streets when you are, you know, a dog.

We tried to approach her but she would quickly hide away. She had her spot in the abandoned house in front of the projects. The house had gates and was locked so we could not enter. A neighbor told us that the owner comes maybe once a week. We left some dry dog food next to the gate and I left my phone number. Nobody called. Lucy and I kept checking on the dog everyday, but she would not let us get close to her. We told Adri, ADLA Shelter Director and my personal hero, about this homeless pregnant dog and one afternoon the three of us, Adri, Lucy and I, equipped with special net (to throw over her) went to catch the dog.

But the dog did not want to leave. Adri, Lucy and I spent 2 hours trying to trap this very stubborn dog, who was growling, showing her teeth and ferociously barking at every attempt we made to approach her. This was a dog who was in an advanced stage of pregnancy, but that didn’t prevent her from running away and passing through the narrow spaces between the fence from one house to another so we could not get to her. The neighbor who was painting his house at the moment got involved in the chase and so did the children from the caserio.  We almost gave up. It was SO hot out!!

Ela, the day of her rescue

I insisted on her rescue though…

Finally, Lucy skillfully threw the net over the dog. The dog was trapped! She was covered in white paint, from the paintbrush the neighbor decided to use to stop the dog from running away (which was well-intentioned, if a little messy). Adri decided to name the dog after me, Ela.

We took Ela for a vet examination and found out that on top of the malnutrition, broken and hairless tail, she had demodectic mange, sarcoptic mange, anaplasmosis, erlichiosis, and the worst: heart-worm disease. We also noticed her bite was a little crooked (probably caused by being kicked hard in the jaw). Because of her advanced pregnancy the doctor decided to wait with all the treatments until she finished nursing her babies-she gave birth a few days later.

Ela arrives at the Shelter

Once at the Shelter she was given a run, food and water. We left her alone to relax and adjust to her new space.

Post-pregnancy vet visit

At first she didn’t eat the dog food so I remember cooking rice with meat for her. Robinson, Adri’s husband, was the one who’d come every day to feed Ela and clean her space. He gained her trust. But not Adri, not Lucy and not me – we were afraid of Ela’s bite as she growled at us and would show her teeth.

On Friday, August 7, 2015, Ela gave birth to 5 pups. During nursing Ela’s skin problems worsened and she lost most of her hair. After 6 weeks with her pups, when they were big enough to be separated from their mom, we were able to start her on treatments for her multiple health problems.

One day I was giving Ela a bath in the solution of sulfur and lime (for the sarcoptic mange) and one of the volunteers said “she looks kinda like a chupacabra ... it’s true, she didn’t look good at that time. I also have distinct memories when I took her to the vet for the vaccinations and skin treatments. She mentioned twice that I could put the dog down…I coudn’t believe it! It made me so angry. If I pick up a dog from the street and bring her to the doctor, it is because obviously she needs medical help; it is not to euthanize her, it is to cure her! How dared she even mention it?

As a Shelter dog, Ela was initially timid with people; she just plain did not trust them and did NOT want them approaching her. But, she LOVED dogs, the bigger, the better. She was the only small dog out with the big ones, and she was the most intimidating, ferociously guarding the Shelter and her dog friends.

Adri would say: “Ela insists she is a big dog… Imagine, someone will fall in love with Ela one day and let her sleep on their bed...”

I was very skeptical of this…

Ela’s pups

Ela gave birth to 5 pups: Charlie, Nala, Bongo, Kimba and Keisi. After 6 weeks of being breast-fed by their mom, they were moved to a separate space, a little baby cradle Adri placed next to her kitchen. They all had some skin problems and some worms, which is quite common for pups and Adri was taking care of them with all the resources she had.

One Saturday morning my friend Amanda decided to join us for the clean up. It was her first time. I remember I used to tell Amanda about Adri, how she is my hero, how charismatic she is and how she has this unexplainable amount of energy to put towards saving dogs and the trust that all will turn out well at the end, and that God will take care of us.

But the day Amanda came, Adri was not like herself. She was cranky, low energy and disheartened. I’ve learnt later why she was so depressed: earlier that day she found Nala, one of  Ela’s 5 pups, dead. She buried Nala somewhere in the backyard of her mom’s house (the house she turned into the shelter).

Did Nala have to die? Ever since I met Adri she was struggling to keep the shelter running with extremely limited financial resources, all donations from friends and supporters she was able to make and keep over the years. But these were simply insufficient compared to the need, to the never-ending number of homeless dogs you encounter on the streets. And it is very difficult to plan when you have to rely on donations, on the good will of people. At the time I started volunteering at the shelter, there were 116 dogs housed there. Adri is an angel in human skin, always sensitive to animal suffering, she wanted to save them all.

On the balance, at the vet office

Charlie being examined

The day Nala died, I took the remaining 4 pups to the vet. The doctor was kind enough to save my costs by only examining one pup and treating the rest for the same condition. He did the exam and blood tests on Charlie, the smallest one. Kimba, Bongo and Keisi received the same medicine. Everybody started getting better.

A few weeks later, sometime in September 2015, Adri was fighting the highly infectious parvovirus manifestation at the shelter. Adult dogs, vaccinated against parvo, usually can survive the infection. But puppies, whose immune systems are not yet developed, are an easy kill for the virus. To treat the sick pups and to not transfer the virus, every person at the shelter had to follow rigorous procedure: wear gloves, gowns and disinfect everything each time, including the shoes. It is a deadly virus and very easy to transmit. Ela’s pups were not affected thus far and I asked Adri if I could take them home to make sure they did not catch parvo. And that’s how I brought Ela’s 4 pups to our penthouse in old San Juan. I must say they were quite a bit of work but at the same time a real bunch of joy! Here is one of the videos I took:

Ela’s pups stayed with me til the virus at the shelter was stopped and it was safe to bring them back.

Me, Leo, Kimba & Bongo

It is easy for me to get attached to a dog. Or to 4 dogs. I think it was mutual. I wish I could have kept  them all…After a few weeks I brought them back to the shelter with a heavy heart. Afterwards, each time I would go to the shelter they would go crazy seeing me; and I wanted to spend all my time with them.

Keisi and her new parents in NY

Soon Charlie was adopted by a family of teachers who came to volunteer at the shelter.  Later I took Kimba and Bongo again to my home for a visit, and here they stayed till now… Keisi, the biggest of the four, flew to the Animal Rescue Fund of the Hamptons, in NY and in August 2017 was adopted by a young couple. Keisi was always very special to me. I hope one day I will hear from her parents.

Ela’s Adoption!

After few months at the shelter Ela gained weight and her coat grew back dark chocolate brown and shiny.

But it was after many more moons when Ela learned to trust, I believe, for the first time in her life. She became such a sweet girl, loved to be picked up and hugged. She responded to her name and loved to kiss (aka lick) – we never thought we would see this day: that she would trust a human again. She was ready to be adopted!

In September 2017, right after Hurricane Maria which devastated the island, Ela’s future adopter got in touch with us. The wonderful Martha Bozeman already had three doggy kids and was looking for a fourth. Ela turned out to be the one!

After much finagling considering the hardships Puerto Rico was going through, lack of flights and resources, we were able to fly Ela with a volunteer, to Martha in Orlando, Florida. At the time of her adoption Ela was around 3.5 yrs old.

Martha said, on Oct 29th 2017: “Ela the dog arrived in Orlando last night….I think she will be happy here. I know we are happy to have her.

On the picture below you can see Martha, Rich with their dogs. From right to left: Molly, Olivia, Lily and Ela. Lily, the 17-year-old chihuahua has been with Martha for 15 happy years but recently she has passed away. RIP, Lily.

Ela with her forever family

Martha on Ela: ““She finally is the big dog she always thought she was”

Very gentle dog……. really the best personality overall of any of mine as I said. I am hoping her calmness rubs off on two of my other ones on our walks as they always have to put on a show if we pass other dogs.…She could teach all three of them better manners. She is so good and sweet to everyone

Ela sleeping in bed…

And Adri’s Prediction came true: ELA WAS SLEEPING IN BED WITH HER HUMANS!  Ela likes to sleep under the blanket between her parents and two of the other three dogs (she’s the biggest of them all), and most mornings she enjoys a belly rub before getting out of bed.

You should have seen my face when I saw the picture of Ela sleeping on the bed under a white blanket…😲 Unbelievable!

Martha: “She continues to do well in adapting to life with us. She initially had a good bit of difficulty walking with the other dogs, but I finally figured out that all she wanted to do was turn in circles periodically on the leash. I think it is a safety thing. She has to turn around and see what is behind her. So I just let her turn in circles periodically, and she seems happy. She continues to sleep with us every night and is such a cuddly dog.

Ela and her sister Molly. Two tired Easter bunnies…

“My husband Rich and I knew she was warming up to us when we could feel her wet nose on the back of our calves as we were fixing her dog bowl for breakfast and dinner. Her nickname is Moose because she’s as big as a moose compared to the other three dogs and she’s sweet as chocolate mousse.”

Ela was very quiet for a couple of months and has now starting imitating her sister Olivia who opens up a can of whoop ass on any dog that walks by. So I was hoping Olivia would learn from her, but she has learned from Olivia, and I can’t help but laugh. She is truly part of the pack now.”

That is really funny because her children, Kimba and Bongo, do the same when I walk them!

We always thought Ela was a chihuahua mix, probably because of her ears, but according to her DNA results, Ela is 62.5 % Min-pin, 12.5% Chow Chow, 25% Mixed breed.

Martha: “and 100% Love Muffin!”

Chupacabra? Or Love Muffin, Moose, Chocolate Mousse, Mellow Mushroom ? As Martha likes to call her…

I’m so happy it was Martha who adopted Ela. I have never met her in person, but I know she is a very compassionate human being. It is so good to know this small, once homeless dog, the mother of my 2 dogs, is truly loved and cherished by her humans.

Ela in Florida, “surveying her kingdom”

 

To all our supporters for making these beautiful stories a reality! Every dog deserves a safe place to rest its head and we couldn’t be prouder to do our part to achieve this.

There are still so many more dogs in Puerto Rico like Ela: abused, helpless, scared and sick. CLICK HERE TO DONATE NOW to help us continue saving these animals!

Thank you for reading.

Join us in making this world a better place for all animals!

Love,

Ela

PS. If you wish to talk to me directly, you can email me at ela@amigosdelosanimalespr.org

Shelter Rebuild: One year after Hurricane Maria

Shelter Rebuild: One year after Hurricane Maria

By Natasha San Miguel, ADLA volunteer

It’s almost the anniversary of Hurricane Maria, and Amigos de los Animales (ADLA) is diligently working to finish rebuilding its dog shelter after the devastating effects of the hurricane that hit Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017, and, according to news reports, resulted in the deaths of over 4,500 Island residents and the disappearance of an unknown amount of stray dogs and cats.

Hurricane Maria threatens the lives of ADLA’s rescue dogs

Located in the beach town of Piñones, Loiza, ADLA’s shelter was hit hard by Maria:

“I stayed at the Shelter during the Hurricane and it was horrible. I thought our roof was going to blow off. The Shelter would have been completely destroyed if not for the boards we put up to protect the windows. The dogs were all freaked out; they didn’t know what was going on,”

says Shelter Director Adrienne Galler Lastra, who has lived at the Shelter for over 10 years and cared for the thousands of dogs rehabilitated be ADLA.

The Shelter houses approximately 60 to 70 stray and abandoned dogs at any given time and the Hurricane left the structure in such a shambles the organization was unsure it would be able to continue rescuing. ADLA either had to come up with a way to rebuild, or the shelter would have to shut down. Some of the destruction consisted of the gates surrounding the Shelter being ripped from their hinges and for months following the hurricane, gates were held up with rope and plastic ties.

shelter rebuild

The hinges could not withstand the force of the Hurricane and gates were being held together by rope. At any time, the rope could have given way and the dogs would have been able to escape the patio of the shelter.

 

gates prior to rebuild

These gates separated the runs from the patio. It was becoming very hard for shelter staff and volunteers to move from the patio to the runs and dogs were at risk of injury from protruding metal screen edges.

 

The coverings of the back and front patio were also ripped off by the wind, as was the tin lining covering the dog runs. The ceiling of the interior of the shelter leaked every time it rained, and the sand brought in from the beach clogged the drainage system in the back.

All over the Shelter the ceiling had begun to deteriorate and after the rains during and following the Hurricane desperately needed a rebar treatment and repatching.

 

back part of shelter drainage

The rebuild begins

In December 2017, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals ® (ASPCA) awarded $10,000 to ADLA to put towards rebuilding the Shelter and preventing further damage. Early 2018, PEDIGREE Foundation ® awarded an additional $2,500 for the Rebuild. These funds were instrumental in completing Phase I of the Rebuild: which involved sealing the roof to prevent further damage by rainfall; removing and reinstalling new gating throughout the Shelter; and replacing the covers of the coverings for the front and back patio. The funds also provided for replacing the gates of the runs, along with the tin roofing on the runs which protects the dogs from the sun and rain.

“Thanks to the generous grants we received from ASPCA and Pedigree, we were able to continue to allocate our regular funding towards saving the animals, which was especially important during this time of real need for the community of Loiza and Piñones Beach, and the stray dogs roaming our town.” says Adri.

front porch reconstruction

Front Porch after Rebuild. The carton was replaced as well as some of the wood which had rotted from the moisture.

 

About ADLA and its location

Piñones Beach is a popular beach and weekend hangout for Puerto Ricans. It is also a very low-income neighborhood (with the majority of the population living under the poverty level), and a famous dumping ground for unwanted dogs.

“People think that because they leave the dogs on a beach, and there are kiosks and restaurants all over, and people coming and going, the dogs will get by; some might even hope their dog will get picked them up. But these animals are meant to be cared for as companions, they can’t get by on their own.” Adri continued: “Here, the perception of companion animals is slowly changing. In a way, the media attention Puerto Rico has received since Hurricane Maria has been a blessing for the animals. Not only are more pets being rescued, but people are watching it happen; it’s being broadcast. By witnessing the effort organizations and individuals are willing to put into rescuing, people are realizing these animals are worth it.”

kids on beach with Adri

These are some Piñones residents on the beach with ADLA’s Shelter Director Adri and her service dog Cinderella. Adri regularly visits the beach with Cinderella and usually another well-socialized rescue dogs to teach the young children about proper pet care.

 

Thanks to the grant support, ADLA has been able to continue its mission of rescuing and rehoming stray dogs (some of these extremely abused). Everyday, there are new dogs roaming the streets and the hurricane has exacerbated the situation. Many residents left the Island or lost their house, resulting in the abandonment of their pets. ADLA has rescued close to 200 dogs since the hurricane.

Micah

This is Micah. Micah was rescued on the road that runs along Piñones Beach. He had an old burn wound on his side probably from an acid or grease burn. Micah spent about 2 months at the Shelter before he was transported to New Hampshire by Hearts and Tails Animal Alliance.

 

Manchitas Puppies

These are Manchita’s puppies. Manchita is owned by a homeless woman, and was pregnant but could not give birth. ADLA took Manchita to the vet where a cesarean was performed. Manchita’s 10 babies were bottlefed from birth and at approximately 3 months of age flew to a sister shelter in the United States. In this photo, they are sleeping with their pet gorilla. Their mom Manchita was returned to her owner.

Continuing to Rebuild

The second phase of the Shelter Rebuild is currently underway and involves construction on the ceiling, electrical circuits damaged by the storm, as well as repainting: “We will still lose electricity from time to time, and this damages our circuitry,” Galler-Lastra explained. “We still don’t know the extent of the damage or the full cost of repairs. Yet we are so blessed not have so far been spared of hurricanes or serious storms this year.”

ADLA is looking for volunteers and donations to complete the second phase of the Rebuild. For those interested in contributing funds or services contact info@amigosdelosanimalespr.org. Donations can be given online or sent by mail to HC 2 Box 7622, Loiza, Puerto Rico 00772.

About the PEDIGREE Foundation

Formed in 2008 by the makers of PEDIGREE ® food for dogs, the PEDIGREE ® Foundation is an independent 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to helping dogs in need find loving homes by supporting the good work of shelters and dog rescue organizations throughout the country. Through no fault of their own, more than four million dogs end up in shelters and rescue organizations every year, and nearly half of them never find a place to call homes. For more information on how you can support the foundation visit https://www.pedigreefoundation.org/.

About the ASPCA®

Founded in 1866, the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) is the first animal welfare organization in North America and serves as the nation’s leading voice for animals. More than two million supporters strong, the ASPCA’s mission is to provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to animals throughout the United States. As a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation, the ASPCA is a national leader in the areas of anti-cruelty, community outreach and animal health services. For more information, visit https://www.ASPCA.org, and follow the ASPCA on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Meet Micah, Kay and Grace

Meet Micah, Kay and Grace

Meet Micah Kay and Grace

Meet Micah, Kay and Grace: Just a handful of our favorite Shelter pups waiting for their own big day: the day they’ll find their forever homes! Like all satos, each of them have their own special back story and quirks. And (like all satos) they are each lovable and have the same goal: to make us happy!

Since August 18th is Clear the Shelters Day, all sato adoptions now through August 18th are only $50. Let’s meet Kay and Mercy, two doggies waiting for their chance at a family…

Kay: A crazy girl looking for love <3

Kay is hand-down the most attention-grabbing dog at the Shelter! She’s also generated much social media interest and is really a “twitter” all through the Shelter. She loves following whomever happens to be near her, and is just an energetic bundle of love in need of a home all her own.

Here is Kay’s own special Adopt-me video made by one of our volunteers and one of Kay’s favorite peoples!

To see more videos like these, follow us on Facebook!

(If you already are following us and wondering why you didn’t see this video, make you set your setting to see all our posts: Click the Follow button under our cover photo; Check the box marked “See First.” Thanks!)

Back to Kay…

A Twitter follower recently generated this lovely poster (and others!) to help get Kay adopted. We love them and thought we’d share.

 

To see more of Kay and our other adoptable pups, follow us on Twitter!

DONATE NOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN A SATO’S LIFE.

Grace: Full of grace, she’s a little lady: independent and sweet

Meet Micah, Kay and Grace

Grace is our quiet little love who we’ve had since mid-April. She’s come out of her shell since then and seems to definitely be a “people” dog: in fact it looks like she might prefer people to her own species. We’ve received a couple adoption interests in Grace, but she’s still waiting for that lucky someone.

Will it be you?

Micah: rescued with an open wound; we are happy to announce he is one step closer to his own Happy Beginning!

Our Shelter Director Adri was on her way back from grocery shopping for the shelter when she saw Micah on Route 187. He was sitting on a mount, perfectly content watching the cars pass by. When Adri approached, he wagged his tail and went up to her. She could see he had a horrible burn on the left underside of his belly, which had left his flesh open to possible infections. She immediately knew we had to take him.

 

 

 

 

 

Micah was brought to the vet who medicated the wound and it is now almost healed over! Here is a picture of Micah two months after his rescue getting looked over by a veterinary assistant student from Edic College. On July 31st, Micah is set to make his forever flight to Hearts and Tails Alliance in New Hampshire. We look forward to sharing the first leg of the voyage with you!

DONATE NOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN A SATO’S LIFE.

Meet Micah, Kay and Grace

We hope you enjoyed meeting Kay, Grace and Micah!

If you think you’re the forever mom and dad that will change the world for one of our rescued dogs, email ela@amigosdelosanimalespr.org and we’ll take it from there!

We are also looking for volunteers to give us a hand with getting our pets adopted on Clear the Shelters Day. Let us know if you are available!

STRAY DOG BECOMES “KISSER THERAPIST”

STRAY DOG BECOMES “KISSER THERAPIST”

Carmen: Stray Dog Becomes “Kisser Therapist”

By Debra Malinics, adopter of ADLA alum Carmen, the “kisser therapist

I have owned neurotic dogs, psychotic dogs, crazy dogs, but never one as wonderful, sweet, smart, and loving as Carmen, a sato adopted from Amigos de los Animales through Wag on Inn in Oakhurst, NJ.

Carmen the kisser therapist

When my husband and I walked into the pet store to meet her, this little ball of fur ran right into our laps, licked us and next thing I knew, she was coming home with us. We had found our dog! and she was perfect from the start.  We named her Carmen in honor of her Spanish heritage.

At that time, I was on the board of a non profit planning a fashion show fund raiser. I suggested we add a dog or two to the venue, and three weeks later, Carmen stole the show wearing a Burberry coat accessorized with a brown and green braided leash, and behaving absolutely flawlessly.

Carmen on the catwalk with her Burberry coat

Carmen on the catwalk with her Burberry coat

On the way across the stage, I dropped her leash, put her is a sit stay command, and kept moving onto the runway. Carmen sat perfectly still, looking out over the audience, her eyes wide with wonder. She was perfectly poised and calm. While I whirled and twirled, Carmen remain seated, looking chic in her outfit. I picked up Carmen’s leash on leaving the stage and we walked off together to the audience’s delight and applause. Many attendees came to ask me how she was so well behaved and what was my secret…I said simply, Los Amigos de los Animales.

Friends kept telling Carmen should be a therapy dog because she emits such love but I didn’t have the time to take her to classes. “She doesn’t need classes,” friends insisted… she’s perfect already! She’ll pass without trying, repeated a friend and bet me $20 that she would. I couldn’t resist.

Carmen giving Debra's late husband Bernard some kissing therapy

Carmen giving some kissing therapy

I took Carmen to the next available Therapy dog certification class without any usual classes or preliminary training.  Do you have your good citizen papers the woman asked when I registered her.  Clueless, I said, “No, no, I’m a citizen.”. Looking at me oddly, she said, “I mean for your dog.” “Oh, she’s a citizen too,” I replied, “she was born in Puerto Rico.”  The woman just shook her head and asked me to fill out a form to begin. Carmen was perfect. I lost the bet, but Carmen won the class. Out of 14 well trained dogs, three passed the test and Carmen was one of them. I was so proud!

As a therapy dog, Carmen brings joy and love to children, students and adults. Everywhere I go, people fall in love with her and on her therapy visits, they call her the “Serial Kisser” because she spends her time kissing everyone in the room. Some colleges arrange their schedules around Carmen’s schedule. She has magic and when I look into her eyes, it seems they see into the universe.

When people say how lucky Carmen is to have us, I say, “WE are the lucky ones.” There are so many wonderful ways to share your life and your love and sharing it with an animal is one of the best. Animals make the world a better place for all.

When my husband was ill, Carmen was at his side 24/7, and after his death, she gave her love and support to me when I grieved. Carmen is an ambassador for all good things and I wish the world had more Carmens to set an example for us, the people who need it. Thank you Amigos de los Animales for bringing her into our lives. Now if I can figure out how to clone Carmen…If they did it with Dolly, surely they can do it with Carmen, my kisser therapist.

Carmen posing as a jungle princess

 

Important read for donors: Double your Donation!

Important read for donors: Double your Donation!
Attention Amigos de los Animales Donors!!! You can Double your Donation!
How????
Corporate matching gift programs!!!! Of course!

Corporate matching gift programs are charitable giving programs setup by corporations in which the company matches donations made by employees nonprofit organizations:

THAT’S US!!! Amigos de los Animales!!!

For example, if you work for Bank of America, lets say, and YOU donate $100, Bank of America will double the donation by ALSO DONATING $100.

Did you know that more than 15 million employees work for companies with matching gift programs? A few examples include:

Johnson & Johnson – Triples donations with $2:$1 matches for current employees while also doubling donations for retirees.

Bank of America – Matches donations $1:$1 up to $5,000 annually per employee.

Home Depot – Matches donations $1:$1 up to $3,000 annually per employee.

Last year we received matching gifts from Johnson & Johnson as well as American Express!

Last year we received over $10,000 in matching gifts! We know many more of our donors work for other companies with matching gift programs we’ve set a goal of raising $20,000 for 2018: Doubling our Matching Gifts from these programs!

Help us get there!!

  1. CLICK HERE TO DONATE NOW!
  2. CLICK HERE TO CHECK TO FIND OUT IF YOUR EMPLOYER WILL MATCH! Fill out your company’s requirements.
  3. You ask: Do I have to complete the requirements??? That sounds like work...

We wish we could complete the process for you, but unfortunately the company employee has to
do it. We’d love to help you through the process though. Contact us with any questions!

Didn’t see your company listed on our Double the Donation page? Wait! Don’t despair! Make sure to check with your HR department as your company may offer other benefits for your donation; or may be new to corporate matching!

In 2018, we have rescued and rehomed 94 dogs so far! If we meet our matching gift goal of $10,000 for the remainder of 2018, we’ll be able to rescue more dogs and you’ll be a crucial part of this! So help us continue rescuing: Double your Donation today!

Don’t forget to CLICK HERE to read our latest newsletter. Subscribe so we can keep you updated on our goals and rescues.
Also, for even more daily updates: Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

Puppy Storms!

Puppy Storms!
Hello Everyone! Happy April Showers; almost May Flowers

Lately, we’ve been caught in the middle of Puppy Storms!!! Just last week, we rescued Manchita, who was heavily pregnant. We finally had to bring her to a vet who performed a caesarean on Friday. We are now bottle-feeding her 10 puppies every two to three hours! Been doing this since the birth, so we are exhausted, but more on Manchita and her pups in the next post. Elder puppies come first:

12 Puppies got their Wings!!

This weekend, we just sent a rowdy bunch of 12!!! to St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center in New Jersey. These little guys loved to play around when they were let out of their run! They also loved to get bathed by volunteers. Click on their bathing for a YouTube video!

 

Pam: a Paw Recovery Story!

We just received Pinky and Pam April 13th (lucky day for us!); and are busy healing Pam’s bad paw. They are the cutest pair of furry black babes!

 

 

 

Blanca’s Babies

And we’ve got Blanca’s Puppies, who around 21-days old and the absolute cutest things! We can’t get enough photos of them! LOOOVVE!

 

And finally!!!! Being surrounded by puppies reminded us of the sand storm we experienced last month on the Shelter. On March 5th, strong currents, high wind and 30-feet high waves affected our little beach town. Homes flooded; businesses were partially destroyed, and cars were ruined. The next day, the police had to close the road leading into the Shelter in order to remove all the sand that had accumulated. The waves had decreased but the ocean remained unsafe with the waves reaching 15 to 20 feet.

Check out a video taken the day after the event!

In fact, we named one of Blanca’s puppies Sandy, after the storm! Help Sandy and her sisters and brothers stay healthy! Every penny we receive goes towards ADLA’s mission: to help end animal abuse and abandonment in Puerto Rico!

DONATE TODAY. Then check to see if your employer will match what you give!

Thanks for reading and all your support!
Happy Yapping/Sqealing!!
~ Adri and Amanda 🙂
   Team Amigos de los Animales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prevention of Cruelty of Animals in April 2018

Prevention of Cruelty of Animals in April 2018

This is Titán. One of our volunteers found this lovable bull-nosed terrier wandering in the street by himself. But that is not the worst of it.

Titán has whiplashes up and down his back! WHHAAT!!!

How could any person do this??? But yet it is so prevalent that the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) dedicated the month of April to specifically right this: the Prevention of Cruelty against Animals.

Year-round, rescue organizations and dedicated individuals fight animal abuse and cruelty that can come in so many forms: punishments, neglect, hoarding, inhumane factory farming and death for sport or fashion. While it is people that are causing this pain, people can also make a difference.

Amigos de los Animales, along with Puerto Rico’s Health department and the Career Development Institute based in New Jersey, annually coordinates a week-long course to certify people as Animal Control Officer/Cruelty Investigators. So far, approximately 298 Officer/Investigators have been certified.

All animals deserve to live a life free of intentional infliction of pain caused by the whims, desires, or pleasures of humans. It is up to us to make this happen!

Email Amanda@amigosdelosanimales.org NOW if you are interested in taking the 2019 course (tentatively scheduled for end of Jan./beginning of February), and we will put you on the list to be sent a registration form. Our 2018 course was cancelled due to Hurricane Maria, but you can read the newsletter HERE. 

Titán is a victim of abuse. It is ironic to think that He is one of the lucky ones. He was at least picked up, and is being cared for and rehabilitated. He will always have his scars, however, as a reminder of the power of people.

DONATE NOW! Help us in our fight against Animal Abuse!

 

Surviving Hurricane María!

Surviving Hurricane María!

It’s our first update since the Hurricane and we have so much to say, and so many people to thank; it’s a bit over-whelming! But we are committed to keeping this short and sweet.

As you are all aware by now, Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico September 20, 2017, only two weeks after Hurricane Irma passed slightly north of the island. Days following Maria, we did without electricity, phone service, or internet; and access to businesses; drinking water was contaminated; and both the Shelter and the town of Loiza experienced damages and losses.

Pets were also victims of this disaster as many residents lost their homes, moved, or no longer had the financial means to care for their animals; additionally, for a time, there was an airline embargo denying shipping of live animals in cargo.

Early October we funded a flight for 63 of our rescues to various Shelters in the north-eastern United States. Since then, we’ve continued getting our dogs to no-kill shelters where they will have the best chance of finding their forever home and family: these include St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center; Last Chance Animal Rescue; Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation; Shadow Rose Farm; and Max’s Pet Connection.

 

In total, we’ve been able to fly 143 rescues to safety in the continental United States!

We’d like to thank all our supporters who have made these flights possible! We’d also like to thank those that continually care for our animals in between these flights. Thank you, all our volunteers and hard-working vets!

We cannot do it without your support!

 

Please stay tuned for more about the recovery of our structural damages; our rescues; and how you can help! We are committed to get as many pets as possible off the streets and into safe forever homes. Join us in our mission.

Amigos de los Animales relies on the continued support of donors like you!

Donate now and save lives!

We’re taking it to Colorado!!!!!!

We’re taking it to Colorado!!!!!!

I’m reaching out to you, and any of your friends who might be able to help us at Amigos de los Animales (ADLA) in regards to a new initiative I’m working on with dear friend and sister ACO/CI Jennifer Montry. Montry is an expert in sustainable businesses and is helping us find appropriate sheltering solutions for some of Puerto Rico’s Husky and Alaskan Dog strays which do so well in the cold mountain climates.

Since I have been president of Amigos de Los Animales, here in Puerto Rico, we have been rescuing Huskies, Malamutes, Samoyeds and other arctic type long-haired breeds. They are so uncomfortable in this heat.

By now, you all know there is a huge problem on the island with dog over population and now that the PR economy has collapsed, there are many more dog owners who have abandoned their pets to the streets and beaches, and leave them to suffer and die alone. Many of those dogs are arctic breeds which do not belong in tropical environments in the first place and who suffer greatly in 85+ degree year-round weather.

Most of the smaller dogs we take into our shelter in PR get shipped to no-kill shelters along the east coast US where they get adopted. We have a partnership with American Airlines and a unique collaboration with other rescue orgs. such as All Sato Rescue who have helped us transport throughout the years. Once we get them spayed/neutered and they receive full vet checks and socialisation we ship our rescued pets to US mainland shelters where they are adopted.

What’s the plan?
Certified Animal Control Officer / Cruelty Investigator, Jennifer Montry is based just west of Denver. She has lived in Denver for 3 years and among other things, she currently runs the most profitable Airbnb rental property in Colorado. The plan is for Amigos de los Animales to buy a farm property west of Denver with loads of acreage, that will be used as our non-profit Arctic Dog Rescue which will re-home these beautiful cold weather rescues out of Puerto Rico and into great homes in Colorado’s more climate-appropriate environment.

The shelter will be economically sustainable by running off funds generated from renting the main house out on Airbnb to tourists, and will piggy back off the success of Jennifer’s current listing, And it will bring in a monthly rent to the ADLA shelter here in Piñones, Puerto Rico.

Between us Jennifer and I have a few decades of experience in dog rescue and we have enlisted the help of a crowd funding specialist and marketing team to help us raise the funds for the property. As part of our responsibility in beginning a successful crowd funding campaign we must unite a list of 150 individuals who are passionate about protecting animals and willing to help us out in any way possible.

This does not mean we are looking for donations right now, but rather, we are looking for people who are passionate about helping the abandoned and abused animals of PR and would agree to spread the word of what we are trying to achieve. Would you be willing to help Amigos de los Animales grow so we can continue helping the homeless strays of Puerto Rico?

We need your help in any way possible to help spread the word of what we are trying to do to save Huskies, Alaskan Dogs and double coated dogs from Puerto Rico. If this describes you, please send me your name and email address to be part of the 150 people we need in order to begin our campaign.

Thanks for your time, please share this message and feel free to contact either Jennifer at 312-350-4266 or Adri (me) at 787-313-5653 if you have any ideas or you can help in any way. Please share your name and email to be a part of this exciting initiative and if you can send us 4 or 5 names of your animal activist friends and their email addresses, you will really be helping out!

Many Blessings and thanks for reading!!
Adri